My First Video

The video that is embedded in this blog post is a bit different from the other videos i have shared with all of you so far, in that I did not create this video for the sole purpose of fulfilling an assignment for this class. In fact, this video was created by a friend of mine and I many years ago. When My friend and I were younger, we were constantly experimenting with film making, hoping to one day make a movie of our own. Unfortunately almost none of these projects were ever actually finished, however there is one exception, and that is the video I am sharing with you today. That’s right, the video below is the first movie I ever finished making, and I’m extremely glad that after all these years I finally get to share it with someone.

Annoying World

 

Analysis of Baby Driver

For this assignment I decided to analyze a scene from the 2017 film “Baby Driver”, which, as I state at the beginning of the video,  was my favorite film of last year. Full warning, the video I created and posted below is far from my nest work. As I have stated numerous times over the course of this class, I have a particular issue with figuring out how to properly use and work with new computer programs, and this was no different. Admittedly, movie maker is far easier to get the hang of than some of the other programs we have used so far this semester,  but I still had a fair amount of trouble with things such as audio mixing. Because of that, my voice over below came out extremely stilted and awkward, however I do still think I made some good points, and hopefully you can see past my awful voice over to notice them.

I Loved This Assignment!

I’ve probably mentioned at some point in these numerous blog posts that I love movies, and I hope to work in the entertainment industry one day. So naturally assignments that involve analyzing pieces of film history, as well as just talking about them in general, fits right up my alley. When I first started this assignment, I knew exactly how I was going to approach it, and that was just writing down the thoughts I have about film on a daily basis, usually when I’m staring off into space instead of doing something more important. That’s really all I have to say though. This stuff is my specialty and I can’t wait to work on it even more this week.

My Thoughts on Video Production

How To Read a Movie

Daily Create #5

Ring Around the Rosie

Ring Around the Rosie

Ring Around the Rosie is honestly the only nursery rhyme from my childhood that I can remember, probably because it’s the only one I legitimately enjoyed listening to. Whats interesting about this nursery rhyme that you may not no about is that the song is actually describing the events of the Black Plague. If I were to write a story about this nursery rhyme, I would incorporate this little known fact into the plot as a means to give a dark twist to a beloved song.

Daily Create #5

My Thoughts on Video Production

If there’s anything watching countless movies over the years has taught me is that in order to stand out and keep things fresh, a director has to present the audience with their own unique style of filming, and the videos I have watched just now have only further proved that point. Anyone can just record what is going on in front of the camera, but it takes a truly skilled cinematographer to use the camera as a tool to enhance the scene rather than just record it. As two of the examples I viewed show, Quentin Tarantino and Stanley Kubrick are both masters of cinematography. Every one of their movies contains beautifully shot scenes that highlight each of their own unique styles of filming, those being Tarantino with his iconic upward POV shots, and Kubrick with his gradual zooming in or zooming out in order to gradually focus on a specific object or reveal more about the scene. This is not to say that common shots within movies should be completely disregarded by film makers, as these have remained popular over the years for a reason. Take for example the long tracking shot. When used ineffectually or without much thought, these kinds of shots can be boring and time consuming. However, when used appropriately, as seen in films like Children of Men and Clover-field,  these kind of tracking shots can not only be visually impressive, but can also very effectively establish a certain mood.

How To Read a Movie

I’m gonna be completely honest, despite being a huge film buff my entire life, I never liked Roger Ebert. To be fair, I never really followed or pay much attention to him, nor did I read any of his work, so perhaps I truly do not have an accurate view of Ebert. That being said, from what I do know about and have read from him, Ebert always came off to me as being incredibly smug. He seemed to have ridiculously high standards for films, to the point where anything that wasn’t on the same level as the Godfather or Citizen Kane he would simply dismissed as not being worth watching, being reserved only for those who do not have high-quality tastes in film. On top of this, Ebert seemed to be so committed to his role as a critic that it feels like he forgot that the whole point of a movie is to provide enjoyment to the viewer, and doesn’t need to have some kind of deep psychological insight. With all that being said however, I do think this article written by Ebert was very well done. The whole point of this article basically boils down to the argument that every frame of a movie can contain hard to notice details, imagery with messages hidden in them, artistic shots, and a slew of other filming techniques that may not be noticed unless one slows down to examine them. Not only do I think this is 100% true about most good movies, but this does show Ebert as someone who can definitely appreciate film making with genuine effort put into it, which I admit is something I actually do respect about him.

My Best (and Hardest) Week So Far

Let get the bad parts of the assignments for this week out of the way. I’ve always made it clear right from the beginning of this class that I am particularly not good with electronics, especially when it comes to computer programs. So this week when I was tasked along with the rest of the class to create a story using an obscure and complicated audio platform, I was completely lost. For the first couple of hours I had absolutely no idea what I was doing, and even when I did start to get the hang of things, It was a struggle of confusion and frustration until the very end. The good news is, this all eventually led to what was easily the best assignment for me yet. Having to tell a story through audio really allowed me to experiment and flex my creative muscles. This course has showed me that I really do love to tell stories, to create worlds and characters that capture peoples’ imaginations, and I hope to continue to do this sort of work not only for the rest of this class, but for the rest of my life.

Daily Create #4

The Drop

The Journey

 

The Drop

When thinking about how to tell a story using only sound, I decided the best way to go about doing this was to depict a disaster in process, as we as a society have heard the sounds of disaster so much over the years within pop culture media that it would not be difficult to convey to most people what is going on within the story. In this audio story, I decided to depict a sped of version of the eventual apocalyptic calamity, first by showing normal everyday and peaceful life, then by showing the escalation of violence through gunfire, until eventually the apocalypse commences, after which there is nothing.

https://soundcloud.com/user-397749399/the-drop