The Journey

When telling this story about a hellish post-apocalyptic land, rather than trying to tell a grand sweeping story, I decided to make it a more down to earth tale. To that end, I decided to tell this story from the perspective of a lone traveler, a young man who has never experienced the world before the cataclysmic event left it in it’s current state. I tried my best to convey how the protagonist feels about his current situation, that although he knows he must keep going, he is starting to lose hope with each passing day, and longs for the world to return to the supposedly Utopian state it was in before the apocalypse. The reason I made these creative decisions was because I wanted to make a story that was grounded in reality so that the viewers could easily put themselves into this same situation, and I believe that this young man’s thoughts are an accurate representation of how most of us would respond if we were to be thrust into the same position as him.

https://soundcloud.com/user-397749399/the-journey

The Power of Sound

As I stated just a couple of blog posts ago, I have absolutely no idea how anything audio related works, and going into this week I was extremely concerned I would have trouble keeping up with the assignments given. While I am still pretty much lost when it comes to using sound designer tools, I do now have a far greater appreciation for the power of sound in story telling. As the two videos presented by Jad Abumrad have taught me and the radio drama “Moon Graffiti” allowed me to experience, sound is an instrumental part to storytelling, sometimes even being the defining factor in whether or not the story in question ends up being good or bad. Moon Graffiti in particular has shown me just how “visually” impressive a story with absolutely no visuals can be ( The visuals of course being part of one’s own imagination ). While I don’t think I will ever embrace audio the way many others do, I can at the very least leave this week with a greater understanding of just how impact full sound within storytelling can be.

The Moon Landing Disaster

What Do I Know About Audio?

Daily Creates #3

The Moon Landing Disaster

I absolutely adore these hypothetical “What If?” type of stories, especially ones that are grounded in reality ( The more likely it seems things could have happened a different way than they actually did, the more it tends to hold my interest, as it is generally more interesting to think about ). I had never thought about it before, but even before listening to this story I thought a scenario where the moon landing was a failure held tons of potential. The execution of this story is perfect. The voice acting is great, the dialogue is well written and believable, and  the pacing is perfect, neither feeling rushed or dragged out. But what truly makes the presentation of this story great is the audio. The sounds of radio static signalling the astronauts inevitable demise, the sounds of the shock waves made by Buzz Aldrin kicking at the dust on the surface, even the sounds of the astronauts breathing all help to greatly enhance the overall atmosphere of the story, and In my opinion is what ultimately makes this good story into a wonderful and even somewhat terrifying presentation.

 

What Do I Know About Audio?

Nothing, absolutely nothing, that is my answer. I’m not even joking. When I first looked at the syllabus for this week and saw that there was going to be an entire week dedicated to just audio, I was extremely worried (and still am). I know nothing about audio mixing, how to actively discuss and differentiate one piece of music from the other, and so on and so forth. That is why I was at least somewhat relieved after I listened to the two interviews with Jad Abumrad. I thought his descriptions of audio storytelling were extremely interesting, and there were two moments in particular that stuck out in my mind as I was writing this. The first was his description of the concept of “Cooperative Imagining”, which he explains is essentially a system where the visuals for a story are created through a combination of the narrators  description and style of storytelling, and the listener’s imagination. Through this process, Abumrad states that a storyteller’s ability to put an image into another person’s head signifies true human connection. The second moment that stuck with me in particular was Abumrad’s description of radio hosts( as well as other kinds of audio storytellers) as “modern-day shamans”. The reason this stuck with me is because the more I thought about it, the more I realized he is absolutely right. Individuals today who still tell tales through words rather than visuals are akin to what Abumrad describes as “sitting around a campfire thousands of years ago and creating this real human connection”, and this is a form of storytelling that will most likely never die out as long as humans continue to exist.

Things Are Getting More Interesting

I have to say, after a couple weeks of online assignments, this class is really starting to grow on me. Unlike other classes I have taken in college so far, this class I have noticed really encourages you to flex your creative muscles. You are asked to talk about hings that interest you, and complete assignments in ways that, while still following guidelines given to you by the professor, allow you to put your own unique touch on it. I am constantly learning new things thanks to the types of lessons and tips we are given each week, especially when it comes to technology (as I previously mentioned, I am terrible with computers). I really was not sure how I would feel about a class like going in, but know I can’t wait to see what kinds of topics and assignments we tackle next.

Daily Creates #2

My Childhood Creation

A Look Into what Almost Was

After the Cuban Missile Crisis

 

 

My Childhood Creation

Although I’m pretty embarrassed to admit it, When I was a young child I would often fantasize about being a superhero named “Zone Fighter”. The reason I played pretend like this so frequently was because of my simple love for Japanese giant monster movies and TV show, such as Godzilla and Ultraman. I watched these movies all the time as a kid, so naturally I would envision what it would be like to take part in these epic battles. Below is a design for what I envisioned myself looking like as a superhero, and although it’s not quite how I imagined myself when I was a child, it still does come pretty close.

A Look Into what Almost Was

As I mentioned in my previous blog post, a third world war following the escalation of the Cuban Missile Crisis would have surely had a disastrous effect on Earth and Human civilization. Billions would be killed, and the few who did manage to survive would have to struggle to survive in a harsh new world devoid of the luxuries that were once commonplace. In a scenario like this, it is interesting to think of what effect it would have on the most innocent among us, such as the children. I created this image as a way to evoke a sense of sadness and despair from the viewer, as this small child looks upon the remains of her home, a reminder of how no place on earth is safe anymore, not even the places where we once felt the most comfortable.

After the Cuban Missile Crisis

One of the most famous  and frightening moments during the cold war was the Cuban Missile Crisis. As I’m sure you all know, the Cuban Missile Crisis was an event that nearly led to a violent confrontation between the USA and the USSR, which in turn would have surely led to a nuclear third world war. The events of the book I have created chronicle the events of the survivors decades after a nuclear holocaust stemming from the Cuban Missile Crisis. I created this scenario because the outcome of a nuclear war is something that has always fascinated me, more specifically what the lives of any surviving people would be like from then on out. Below is a step by step guide to how I created this book cover, along with some details on my design choices.

First I added a stock photo depicting what the world may be like after this scenario took place, destroyed and desolate, a true shell of it’s former self. To further emphasize this, I made the unfilled parts of the book cover green, which I’m sure you can imagine is a color that no longer exists in this world.

Next, I added a title, “After”. I gave the cover this title as an ominous foreshadowing to the plot of the book.

Finally, I added a simple plot description to the back of the book, something meant to entice potential readers to pick of the book in order to learn more about this dark, desolate world and the simple people who, for better or worse, still inhabit it.

Afterwords (1)